Tuesday, 20 June 2017

TV Times 17th June 1967

A selection of articles and adverts for the week of 17th June 1967.

The State of the Nation


An article promoting The State of the Nation in which the Labour Prime Minister, Harold Wilson, will face tough questions on his economic policy. There will be questions from men from unions, men from industry, men from the City, a man from a university, a man from the press, a man from France, a man from America and from the man in the street.


At the time, the UK economy was viewed rather poorly due to a trade deficit. Basically, the UK imported more than it exported. The books had not been great for a number of years but 1967 was the year things really went to pot. The 'international situation' mentioned at the bottom is likely to be the Six Day War. This would raise the price of petrol, putting further pressure on the government. There were also a number of major industrial strikes throughout the year. By November, the government would take the decision to devalue the pound. £1 went from equalling $2.80 down to $2.40, the idea being it would make British goods cheaper abroad. Less than a fortnight later, the UK was denied entry to the European Economic Community (EEC), or European Union (EU) as it is has now become.

Harold Wilson's address to the nation attempted to reassure the public.


Play Bill


A 20-year-old Felicity Kendall is in Friday's Half Hour Story, 'Gone and Never Called Me Mother'.



Encore!


A couple of readers are frustrated by a lack of repeats and they would particularly like to see 'some of the better plays' again.


Repeats are few and far between in 1967's TV Times. Actors' contracts and limited broadcasting hours mean they provide little appeal to broadcasters. Children's programmes are the most likely to be repeated, including the likes of Thunderbirds and The Adventures of Robin Hood. Also, in this issue, there are repeats of popular series, The Saint and The Avengers.

Carter's


'Carter's have made me feel younger, brighter and more healthy' says Mrs G. Aldridge of Walsgrave, Coventry. 'Carter's are a safe, gentle but certain laxative'.


Kodak


'Things happen in colour - remember them in colour'


Although photography had been around for some time, it had been many years before portable cameras were available to the masses. Like television, it began in black and white and so manufacturers then have to try to push the benefits of paying more for colour film. There are few colour pages in 1967's TV Times and even fewer colour adverts. The most likely candidates to pay extra for colour are tobacco companies and film or camera manufacturers. The Kodak adverts usually play on emotions and often contain photos of children. Even today, it is still the case that people start taking more photographs once they have children. This spur of the moment photo of a beautiful view with a figure in shadow is an interestingly slightly different take. Having the rest of the page in black and white also really draws attention to the colours.

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